Writing

I love words. Writing has always been important to me. If it’s important to you, I’ve collected a few resources here I hope you’ll find useful, or at least interesting.

Enjoy!

 

youshouldbereading2

These are excellent authors who don’t have the name recognition (yet) to have a million copies of their work in every Barnes & Noble. Some are up-and-comers, some are established pros publishing great work for years. All of them deserve a minute of your time. I’ve listed with the author a piece or two I particularly enjoyed, though I’ve by no means read all of any one’s fiction. (These are heavily tilted toward short fiction from podcasts, because that’s how I generally consume short stories.)

A.M. Dellamonica Child of a Hidden Sea (novel)
Emily Devenport  Postcards from Monster Island” (My favorite short story of 2015);
Now Is The Hour
Annalee Flower Horne “Seven Things Cadet Blanchard Learned from the Trade Summit Incident”
Kat Howard Maiden, Hunter, Beast“;
The Saint of the Sidewalks
Alaya Dawn Johnson A Guide to the Fruits of Hawai’i” (Winner of the Nebula Award for Best Novelette 2014)
Rich Larson M.F.ing Retroparty Freestyle
Marina J. Lostetter Imma Gonna Finish You Off
Will McIntosh The Savannah Liars Tour” (My favorite short story of 2016)
An Owomoyela In Metal, In Bone
Ian Tregillis Testimony Of Samuel Frobisher Regarding Events On Her Majesty’s Ship CONFIDENCE, 14-22 June, 1818, With Diagrams
Marie Vibbert Deshaun Stevens’ Ship Log

 

shouldbelistening

Below are a few of the places I enjoy listening to (free) audio fiction, or commentary on writing. If you’re looking for longer-length works or a wider variety, Audible offers a wide variety of audiobooks for relatively little cost.

 

And just for the heck of it, here are my other favorite (non-writing) podcasts.

the-black-tapes-podcast-2016-icon criminal goodjobbrain heresthething limetown lore rabbits serial stoneycreek tanis wtnv

The Black Tapes – My overall favorite podcast for some time, this is a docu-drama about one intrepid reporter’s quest to uncover supernatural mysteries. Think Serial meets The X-Files. Start at the beginning, and prepare to be hooked.
Criminal
– Fascinating interviews with interesting people involved in bizarre crimes: victims, perpetrators, and law enforcement. Try “Episode 51: Money Tree” for a story about a girl whose identity was stolen when she was just 11 years old by an unlikely culprit.
Good Job, Brain! – A quiz show and offbeat trivia podcast, hosted by four lovably geeky friends. Each episode revolves around a theme, pick one that suits your fancy.
Here’s the Thing – Alec Baldwin interviews artists, celebrities, politicians and others. Baldwin is a surprisingly good interviewer and maintains neutrality (more or less) even on controversial or partisan topics. Try the episodes featuring filmmaker Chris Columbus (Home Alone, Harry Potter) or former Disney CEO Michael Eisner for a good start.
Limetown – Another docu-drama about the strange disappearance of an entire town overnight. It’s just one season of six episodes, but man it’s a good season. Start at the beginning.
Lore – Real life research into the strange and often terrifying myths and folklore of the past and present. Try “Episode 43: Supply and Demand” for the story of where nineteenth century medical schools really got the bodies they needed to teach their classes.
Rabbits – A docudrama about a woman’s search for a friend who goes missing, and how she must explore an alternate reality through a real life game with real life consequences, with tons of 80s nostalgia thrown in. Think of Ready Player One meets the movie The Game with Michael Douglas. Start at the beginning.
Serial – The gold standard for what a podcast should be (at least Season 1 was, anyway). NPR reporter Sarah Koenig reviews a crime, week-by-week, piecing it together for listeners. Start with Season 1, Episode 1, and plan not to do anything else for the next few days.
Stoney Creek – A young woman’s boyfriend is murdered, supposedly by the mythical monster that haunts the woods near the fictional town of Stoney Creek, Oregon. This show is about her search for the real killer, and for whatever lies in wait in the dark of the woods. Start at the beginning (it’s just one season so far, with Season 2 slated for 2017).
Tanis – A spinoff of The Black Tapes (above), Tanis is more nonlinear tripping-on-acid occult story than straightforward mystery. Still it’s an entertaining listen. You don’t have to follow The Black Tapes to get Tanis, but it helps. Start at the beginning.
Welcome to Night Vale – One of podcasting’s perennially most popular shows, this the story of an imaginary town where every conspiracy theory and boogeyman is real. Think NPR + Stephen King + Dave Barry. Start at the beginning, Episode 1: The Dog Park.

 

myownpublished

 

My own (humble) list of published work. Growing all the time!

The Goblin’s Son

“Your son is no longer a child, he’s a sorcerer, and will be powerful one day. He’s doing what he believes is right. He’s trying to protect us. To protect you.”

“I don’t need my son’s protection. I need to protect my son!”

“You can’t,” she said. “Neither of us can. Not anymore. If you won’t support him, it won’t just be your son you lose.”

From “The Goblin’s Son,” published in Swords & Sorcery Magazine, May 2015. Fantasy, 4,840 words. (Read)

The Persistence of RAM

“How much longer?” I called out to the mirrored wall.

The voice crackled back over the speaker. “The experiment is about to begin.”

We both stood, waiting for the door to open. McKayla crossed her arms. I clenched my fists at my sides. “Whatever happens, let’s do this together.” She nodded back at me.

We waited a full minute I’d say. I looked behind me. No other doors opened. No one else entered.

“Where’s the android?”

From “The Persistence of RAM,” published in Silver Blade Magazine, Fall 2016. Science Fiction, 5,008 words. (Read)

King of the Butterflies

For as long as Caleb could remember, the butterflies loved him, and he loved the butterflies. They played together every day on the windswept prairie of his family’s farm. Caleb grinned when he felt the sudden tickle of their tiny feet on his bare arms or nestled in his shaggy brown hair. With his arms out like wings of his own, Caleb raced his little passenger through the overgrown underbrush as long weeds whipped at his short, stubby legs. Throughout the lazy, languid afternoons, tiny silhouettes performed their intricate dance for him, fluttering above the stalks of waving wheat.

The first time a butterfly spoke to Caleb was the summer before he started school.

From “King of the Butterflies,” published in FrostFire Worlds, May 2017. Fantasy, 4,508 words. (Buy)